Archive for November, 2014

Integrating with Palliative Care- Opportunities and Challenges

Recently, I attended the yearly National Seminar given by the Center to Advance Palliative Care. I was honored to be a member of the faculty and on the planning committee. The attendance was over 900- up over 50% from a year ago- a tribute both to the growth of palliative care as a discipline and the respect with which CAPC is held in the palliative care space. This is the place palliative care nurses, doctors and administrators come to find out about best practice in the field from medical issues, to business models, to integration of palliative care into virtually every possible setting on the health care continuum. As Dr. Diane Meier, head of CAPC pointed out in her opening talk, palliative care has now gone from being an innovative practice to standard practice- at least in hospitals. It will soon be unusual for a hospital not to offer palliative care.

Maybe most importantly, palliative care is about caring for the whole person in all dimensions- including the spiritual. Every palliative model includes the mandate to attend to spiritual suffering. The Joint Commission’s advanced certification process in palliative care mandates a chaplain on the palliative team and will likely soon mandate that the chaplain have suitable training. Everywhere I went at this seminar, I heard spiritual care mentioned and included. This was a rare event in health care where no one looked quizzically when you said you were a chaplain, as if to ask “why are you here?”

Given this environment and context, the lack of chaplains was glaring. One of the Tweets from this event, posted by a physician, said simply “Where are the chaplains?” The attendance roles put the number of chaplains at 1% of the total attendance (i.e. about 10). Now, to be fair, the number of social workers wasn’t much greater, but this is still a problem. We as chaplains have rightly complained for years that we are not included- to the detriment of patient care. Now we have a setting that represents maybe the fastest growing discipline in health care and loves to have us, and we are not showing up. On top of that, this event is a phenomenal place for chaplains to learn about how we might add more value to the palliative care enterprise. So this is not just about giving. It is about getting at least as much as we give.

The barriers are mostly pretty obvious. This seminar is not cheap and going likely means not going to something else like the meeting of the chaplaincy body that certifies us. Many chaplains who cover palliative care do not do it full time so there are other responsibilities. Chaplaincy staffing is generally so tight that being aware for 3-4 days puts a burden on our colleagues and on the institution. We all know all of these barriers.

But there are opportunities. Several of the chaplains I did meet at CAPC came at the behest of and at the expense of their institutions who now highly value palliative care and understand how central spiritual care is to that endeavor. My guess is that more chaplains could make the case to their administrations that they should be funded for CAPC. My guess is that many administrations (and many palliative care chaplains) don’t appreciate the opportunities the CAPC National Seminar provides to further integrate spiritual care into palliative care. However, more and more hospitals are seeking Joint Commission accreditation in palliative care and are then trying to figure out how to get chaplaincy included in a way that will pass this process.

So I don’t have any magic answers. My only plea to chaplains involved in palliative care is when the CAPC notice comes around next year; don’t just reflexively press the “delete” button. And, by the way, I could have written this exact post with reference to the convention of the American Academy of Hospice & Palliative Medicine that will be in Philadelphia in February. Hope to see lots of my chaplain colleagues there.

The Rev. George Handzo, BCC, CSSBB
President
Handzo Consulting, LLC

Highlights of the November Issue of the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

Listed below are a few articles from the most recent issue of the journal:

Promoting Evidence in Practice

Methylprednisolone for the Prophylaxis of Pain Flare: Commentary on Yousef and El-mashad
Susannah Ellsworth

Challenges to Pain Medicine Management at Home: Commentary on the Schumacher et al. Papers
Jane B. Hopkinson

Original Articles

Pre-Emptive Value of Methylprednisolone Intravenous Infusion in Patients With Vertebral Metastasis. A Double-Blind Randomized Study
Ayman Abd Al-maksoud Yousef and Nehal Mohamed El-mashad

Pain Medication Management Processes Used by Oncology Outpatients and Family Caregivers Part I: Health Systems Contexts
Karen L. Schumacher, Vicki L. Plano Clark, Claudia M. West, Marylin J. Dodd, Michael W. Rabow, and Christine Miaskowski

Pain Medication Management Processes Used by Oncology Outpatients and Family Caregivers Part II: Home and Lifestyle Contexts
Karen L. Schumacher, Vicki L. Plano Clark, Claudia M. West, Marylin J. Dodd, Michael W. Rabow, and Christine Miaskowski

A Randomized Trial of the Effectiveness of Topical “ABH Gel” (Ativan®, Benadryl®, Haldol®) Versus Placebo in Cancer Patients With Nausea
Devon S. Fletcher, Patrick J. Coyne, Patricia W. Dodson, Gwendolyn G. Parker, Wen Wan, and Thomas J. Smith

To access the articles, you must subscribe to JPSM or be a member of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM). For further information on the Academy, call 847.375.4712 or visit aahpm.org.

Submitted by: David J. Casarett, MD, MA, Senior Associate Editor, JPSM

Suffering is in the Eyes of the Beholder

A recent morning brought the news that 29 year-old Brittany Maynard had ended her life rather than continue what she perceived to be intolerable suffering from an incurable brain tumor. About an hour later I watched a sports report on college freshman, Lauren Hall who the previous day fulfilled her dream of playing in a college basketball game on the team she had been recruited for despite the fact that her doctors said she had only weeks to live as the result of an incurable brain tumor.

Although my only knowledge of these two women is what I see in the media, I was first struck by the similarities between them. Both young, white women with incurable brain tumors who seem to have good social supports, no psychological issues and would seem to have had the opportunity to have access to some of the best health care the world has to offer. Both seem to be in full control of their own lives despite their tragic diseases. Despite all of those major similarities, they seem to have opted to take starkly different roads to their own death. To be clear, I am not implying anything about the goodness, badness, rightness or wrongness of either road. Quite the contrary. My point is the difficulty of determining the right and wrong for any given person despite so many similarities or of making judgments in that regard. One of the lessons I continued to relearn as a chaplain with people with terminal cancer is how ways of approaching the end of one’s life that seemed “wrong” to me gave great meaning and comfort to some patients who chose them.

So what is going on here? My suspicion is that a key issue is how each of us defines and understands “suffering” in our own lives and the lives of others. The reports on Brittany Maynard focused on suffering from physical symptoms. Yet, Lauren Hill suffers from many physical issues. In Brittany’s case, that suffering was at least portrayed by the media as dominating her life and her decision making. In Lauren’s case, that suffering was seemingly put aside and diminished in significance in the service of another goal. Why the difference? Social or psychological factors don’t seem to account for it.

Dame Cicely Saunders taught us many years ago that pain (and suffering) exists in four domains. The one unaccounted for here is the spiritual or existential domain. This domain includes the part of our lives in which meaning making resides. So the degree of any one person’s perceived suffering may not be at all correlated with the intensity of pain in the physical, social or psychological dimensions. That correlation may depend on the meaning of the pain or distress. I have seen many patients for whom physical pain actually reduces their suffering because they believe that any physical pain negates some amount of sin thy have committed and thus brings them closer to being granted eternal life in heaven. Other patients take great comfort from the belief that their illness is caused by their God because it proves that this God is still in control and it is the idea of that control that gives them comfort in their lives. Neither of these beliefs matches my belief system but they clearly reduce suffering for many.
I would submit that the spiritual/existential dimension has more power over how we make decisions about how our lives will come to conclusion (when we are allowed that decision) than is commonly appreciated. Further, as little as we understand the physical, social, and psychological dimensions of suffering, we understand the existential/spiritual dimension far less.

I have no idea why Brittany Maynard and Lauren Hill have apparently taken such different paths and I don’t think I or maybe anyone can ever truly know because only they can appreciate what constitutes “suffering” in their lives and where they each find meaning and comfort. For others to make judgments about the degree of their suffering and how it could be/should be coped with is dangerous territory indeed because we know so little about it and virtually never include it in the calculus of how health care is delivered.

The point here is not to come to this understanding in order to be able to guide all people facing deaths terminal illness to some “best” outcome. The point is to be able to better understand the existential/spiritual dimension and incorporate it in care in order to help patients to the decisions that seem best to them and to make the living out of those decisions possible. Maybe we can come to the day when patients will make informed decisions about what best reduces their suffering and live those decisions out so routinely that it will not be a matter that warrants national news coverage.

The Rev. George Handzo, BCC, CSSBB
President
Handzo Consulting, LLC